Harnessing Marketing Technology to Improve Lifetime Value

Webinar

Featuring

Adobe
Cleveland Clinic
Hileman Group

Description

Our panel of experts discuss the latest trends and challenges faced by healthcare payer and provider systems today in the ever-evolving world of marketing technologies.


You'll hear how healthcare payers and providers are developing and refining their mar-tech stacks to better create, implement and measure marketing programs and the value of personalization.


We discuss use cases and best practice examples of:

  • How leading healthcare organizations leverage their mar-tech stacks to support customers (plan member and patient acquisition)
  • How to drive customer satisfaction, overall brand management, and ultimately customer loyalty.
Thomas Swanson

Thomas Swanson

Head of Healthcare Strategy
Adobe

Adobe
Scott Mowery

Scott Mowery

Sr. Director, Advertising
Cleveland Clinic

Cleveland Clinic
Tom Hileman

Tom Hileman

CEO
Hileman Group

Hileman Group
Alan Tam

Alan Tam

VP, Marketing
Actium Health

Actium Health
1

Transcript


Thomas Swanson:
... course the level a year and a half. Then talk about how we use marketing technology systems in order to better understand our customer, to personalize experiences with our customers. Then take a look into the crystal ball and see what we expect the immediate future to hold.

Thomas Swanson:
As we go ahead and get started, I'd like to welcome Alan Tam, who is the VP of Marketing for SymphonyRM; Scott Mowery who is the Senior Director of Advertising at Cleveland Clinic; and then my good friend, Tom Hileman, who is the President of Hileman Group. Welcome, gentlemen.

Scott Mowery:
Thank you.

Tom Hileman:
Thank you.

Alan Tam:
Thank you. Great to be here.

Thomas Swanson:
Yeah. Now, I'm going to ask each of you and I'll start with Alan, and then we'll go to Tom, and then to Scott to just quickly talk about who you are, your role at your company in which [inaudible 00:01:05]

Alan Tam:
Awesome. Thank you so much, Tom. My name is Alan Tam, VP of Marketing here at SymphonyRM. Very excited to participate in today's conversation. SymphonyRM is a AI-driven, data intelligence and activation platform where we leverage our AI models to really help drive proactive consumer engagement in communications.

Alan Tam:
We do so by connecting all the different various data silos that a health system or health organization has on their healthcare consumers and patients. What we do is we take a look at that data and develop a clear and prioritized activation plan, if you will, for each and every individual healthcare consumer.

Alan Tam:
Very excited to be here to talk and share about that and how that can help healthcare marketers and payers for that matter, develop these clear plans for each of their members.

Thomas Swanson:
Awesome. Thank you, Alan. Tom?

Tom Hileman:
Thanks, Tom. I appreciate it. It's great to be here with this collection of individuals looking forward to the conversation. My name is Tom Hileman, President of the Hileman Group. We're a healthcare MarTech agency that specializes in working with health systems, providers, and payers, enacting both with patients and with physicians.

Tom Hileman:
We spent a lot of time working with our clients to help them engage those individuals for a variety of reasons and measure all of the activities throughout the funnel and throughout the life cycle that ... we work with customers like Cleveland Clinic, Scott wonders himself here in a minute, Baylor Scott & White Health, Vanderbilt University Medical System that are in the academic centers, as well as CHS in the for profit space as well as other providers and payers. It's a privilege to be here. I'll hand it over to you Scott.

Scott Mowery:
All right. Thanks, Tom. Tom and Alan, it's great to be with you today. My name is Scott Mowery. I'm a Senior Director of Advertising at Cleveland Clinic. We are a health system and academic medical center located in Cleveland, Ohio. My efforts that I do in my role is I am directly involved in many of our patient acquisition efforts that we do at Cleveland Clinic.

Scott Mowery:
My team's focus mostly is on paid search and paid social. But we also are very involved with our analytics that we do to whether it'd be measuring traffic or measuring conversions that we're doing as we're trying to acquire patients.

Thomas Swanson:
Awesome. Thank you, Scott. Alan, now, keep in mind, based on the composition of our audience today, we're going to be talking about not only health systems, but also payer groups. When we make reference to customers, okay, we're talking about plan members, we're talking about HCPs, we're talking about patients themselves. I know I have a tendency to fall back on using the default customers.

Thomas Swanson:
That's why I wanted to make sure that we're all operating under the same context that we're talking about. Essentially, anyone who has any form of interaction with their healthcare ecosystem that's made up of HCPs and the payer organizations that they interact with.

Thomas Swanson:
To get started, gentlemen, I want to acknowledge that those of us who live and breathe in the healthcare space, and all of those that are in our audience today, we have witnessed profound change holistically across the entirety of the industry in the last year and a half. I mean, where the COVID-19 pandemic has been very much of a forcing function and an acceleration where the adoption and use of digital marketing technology.

Thomas Swanson:
Digital means or digital channels of engagement have gone from being a nice to have or a potential competitive differentiator to business critical. I think one of the things that the pandemic has done is it shined a very bright light on the fact that the industry as a whole was behind other industries when it comes to the adoption and use of not only digital MarTech technologies, but also how do you collect and use data on your customers in order to personalize experiences?

Thomas Swanson:
Because I think all of us would agree, that personalization of digital experiences is an expectation that all customers have when they're dealing with just about any industry other than healthcare. Healthcare in the last year and a half has come a long way towards addressing that to a more expectation gap.

Thomas Swanson:
Scott, I'd love to start with you as a representative of a healthcare system is how our healthcare systems and payer groups trying to keep up right with the rapid fire changes that we've seen in the course of the last year and a half. I mean, I know there was a lot of immediate pivot to, "Oh, my gosh. We need to do this now."

Thomas Swanson:
Now that that initial panic has kind of set aside, how is it that Cleveland Clinic is keeping up with, not only the technological changes, but the expectations that your customers have of you?

Scott Mowery:
Yeah. I mean, I think that the big thing that we as an organization try to focus on early is we try to focus on our strategy first of how we try to acquire patients and how we work with them. I think it's not as much ... The technology alone isn't really the strategy for us. It's really that can help support what we're doing. It can enhance what we're already planning.

Scott Mowery:
But we're really just ... We try to make sure that we understand what our offering is, what our desired audiences of who we're trying to attract, and then how we go about reaching them. Then we can start to identify, well, what other pieces of technology can help support that? When we think about things like telemedicine or other areas, it's not just jumping in with telemedicine.

Scott Mowery:
It's understanding how does this supplement what we do now? How can it help fill those gaps that maybe have come up because of changes, whether it'd be the pandemic or other things? Make sure, though, that it's still reaching the audience that we are, in fact, trying to go after here? Because if the audience isn't there, the technology can be great, but it's not going to help us.

Thomas Swanson:
Got you. No. That makes perfect sense. I think we're ... I mean, from Adobe's perspective, the importance of going where your audience is, and reaching them where they already are, as opposed to requiring them to come to you is a critical component of the technological staff.

Thomas Swanson:
Now, Tom, I'd be curious from your perspective of working with all of your different customers, what is the hot technological piece right now, or the thing that most of your customers in there pivot to the changes that we've seen in the industry? What was the thing that was most important for them to make sure they had in their technology foundation?

Tom Hileman:
Great question. Probably I'll answer it a couple of ways. One is to piggyback on Scott, the importance of strategy upfront is critical. We often see our clients don't have a clear strategy. That makes it obviously solving that marketing and business problem much more difficult if you don't know where you're aiming yet. From a technological perspective, and I know we'll probably chat about this a little bit more later, Tom, the 360-view of the customer, patient provider, plan member, whichever that might be, is really been on a lot of people's minds.

Tom Hileman:
Typically, folks are talking a lot about how do they get the information integrated from whether it'd be the EMR system, to understand more from the clinical side of things; whether it'd be a CRM system, to understand the holistic side of that; whether it'd be the marketing automation system, which is measuring the engagement and the digital aspects of that.

Tom Hileman:
Probably the hottest topic that we're seeing is really driving in the 360-degree, how do we get a complete picture of both digital and physical, real world and digital of the person? Then the next question is what do we do with that? We have a lot of data. That's really where we're seeing a lot of people spend a lot of time is around getting all that data integrated, and then making it actionable is one of the hot topics that we're seeing right now.

Thomas Swanson:
Perfect, Tom. Yeah. You are spot on that we're going to dig a little deeper into both of those topics that you just mentioned regarding a 360-degree point of view, and then how do you make that actionable. Alan, to wrap up this first question, what are you seeing from the AI and machine learning perspective of what are the most important technological pieces that your customers are looking for?

Alan Tam:
Yeah. Absolutely. I think Tom set it up nicely in terms of having that patient 360-degree and then understanding what we call the next best action for the healthcare consumer or healthcare member. The consolidation or connecting EHRs, pop health systems, CRM, they're all driving towards specific actions for each healthcare consumer. Us as healthcare consumers, we have multiple journeys that we're on.

Alan Tam:
We have multiple actions that we need to take from, "Hey, get your second COVID shot. Come in for your annual wellness. It's time for your colonoscopy, et cetera. What is that single next best action that the care team, that the payer can reach out to the healthcare consumer to drive them towards that one single action that can make a difference.

Alan Tam:
From an AI perspective, it's harnessing the power, harnessing the work that has been set in developing that patient 360 for that next best action in influencing, knowing the right channel, the right type of content to influence that patient to convert, to schedule that appointment, to fill out that health risk assessment form. That's kind of where we're seeing AI being put to use once patient 360 is there.

Thomas Swanson:
Awesome, Alan. Thank you for that. I'm just going to come right back to you, Alan. Then we'll work our way back through Tom and Scott, is define what a 360-degree view of your customer, whether it's a patient or a plan member, or the HCP that works with the patients and the payer groups. What does a 360-degree view to you?

Alan Tam:
Yeah. That's a great question. Because I think healthcare is very unique. Any other industry outside of healthcare would literally kill to have all the data information that healthcare has on each individual healthcare consumer. But when you integrate the clinical side of datasets from the EHR is pop health, et cetera with claims data, with behavioral data, where we see the supply is taking a look at where clinical versus consumer behavioral data intersect.

Alan Tam:
That in itself presents a very interesting opportunity for payers, or healthcare organizations to really drive and influence and connect with the healthcare consumer in terms of where they are. The patient 360 should be able to harness and capture all of that information such that AI models like SymphonyRMs can basically take a look at that and understand not only what that next best action is, but what is the relevant piece of content. I should send Tom right now versus Scott.

Alan Tam:
What channel should I send that through? Is this imperative in at which case, I'm going to go through a call channel or perhaps a text channel? Is this something that's educational that can be delivered just via email, or via at the portal? The combination of all that and taking a look and understanding the importance of the data and the relevance of the data, I think is important.

Alan Tam:
I'll just finish up by, from a personalization perspective it's not just, "Hello, Tom. Hello, Alan." But it's also the right relevant piece of content and the right channel delivered at the right time.

Thomas Swanson:
Yeah. Thank you, Alan. Tom, rather than ask you the same question, I want to just take what Alan just said in that, because I think we would all agree that the 360-degree view of a customer is a combination of consumer data, behavioral data, clinical data, all of these different and potentially very disparate data sets. If to create a 360-degree view of your customer means combining these data sets and using them together in order to create actionable insights, how does a payer group or a health system do that? It seems a pretty daunting task.

Tom Hileman:
Yeah. It's a lot. I mean, I guess the old project management adage of how do you eat an elephant one bite at a time. As what you build ... I think the first thing that you need to talk about is "What's our strategy?" Which Scott alluded to and discussed very thoroughly before. The second piece is really, I think, the data model.

Tom Hileman:
I think you have to look at what is the complete data model, as a few more pieces even add on to what Alan mentioned, one, the provider channels, providers are incredibly important and there's the B2B side of healthcare that fits in there with the payers and the networks, affiliates and all that, which makes it increasingly more complex, and also the caregiver aspect, which is very unique in healthcare, the influence of other people on and the care through those.

Tom Hileman:
I think the second step is to get that model together, Tom, of all the data whether the pieces are. Now once you have it together, though, it's a bit of data-data everywhere. But what do you do with it? I think the classic right person, right message, right time is what all this data should give us. I think if we're going to do it at scale, we really need to look at tools that can scale at personalized level.

Tom Hileman:
Obviously, sometimes going to be things like ERMs, their AI models, or other tools, predictive pieces of that, the marketing automation platforms are uniquely suited to pull in a lot of that data and to make dynamic decisions. I know if Paul Matsen were here and Scott, I'm sure chime in here as well. He would say, "How do we do personalization? How do we do it at scale?" Because we can't be doing manual pieces.

Tom Hileman:
In the world that we live in, provider's space, the payer's space, there's too much scale to be doing one off campaigns 50 of them. We have to build things that dynamically scale. I think we got to look at where you can get your leverage at. To me, that's the data and then some of the MarTech that allows you to scale with personalization, leveraging what the power of computation is, which is really the machine learning and the artificial intelligence.

Thomas Swanson:
Thank you, Tom. Now Scott, I'm going to kind of riff-off of what Tom just said for you, which is, I mean, Cleveland Clinic is in a unique position of being able to collect all of the different types of data that Alan identified before. When you take this data, and proactive a better term, mash it up into the creation of a 360-degree profile.

Thomas Swanson:
I mean, does Cleveland use a CDP or a customer data platform, or if you use multiple platforms? I'm just curious about the practicality of how an organization like Cleveland does that.

Scott Mowery:
Yeah. I think in our organization, I mean, we are trying to get everything into one piece where we can all work with it equally. But I do think it's still a lot of separate systems. I think there's still a lot of work for us to do, and other medical centers to tie it all together. I think also, just to add on to Tom's point earlier about you have all this data now, what do you do with it? I think it's also important to think about, "Well, who has access to the data? Who can use this data to help with our efforts?"

Scott Mowery:
I know in our world and advertising, over the last couple years, we've done a lot of work to develop a close relationship with our contact center. Hear more about what they're hearing and in conversations with consumers who are looking to choose us for care. Can we take that feedback and use it in other ways? Or if we're getting certain data about maybe how our payer mixes for certain campaigns, who should we be sharing that information with in a way that can be actionable for them to improve what they're doing?

Scott Mowery:
I think it's one thing to try to gather all these jigsaw puzzle pieces and put it all together. That's a huge initial step. It's still something I think most places aren't completely ... They don't have the full puzzle flushed out. But I think it's also understanding that when you have it together, who can utilize this in ways that can help them and help the organization as a whole?

Thomas Swanson:
Great answer, Scott. What I want to do next is pivot from the how do you use that data to not only help your organization, do the things that you want them to do? But I think there is an implied or there is an expectation on the part of the customer that they know you're collecting data. I mean, gone are the days where you're either, A, surprised by the fact that your digital behavior leaves a footprint.

Thomas Swanson:
There's this expectation now that, "Well, I know you're collecting data, Scott. How are you going to use that data to better serve me as your customer?" Not necessarily ... I mean, of course, there's the side where you're going to use it internally in order to enable your organization to take the actions that they want to take. But we've mentioned the term personalization more than a few times here.

Thomas Swanson:
From the customer perspective, how do you personalize for me, because I expect that, but also balance privacy, and security, and the regulatory requirements that healthcare, those boundaries that they work within? Because some say most times, I think healthcare organizations, payers, anyone that's involved in healthcare has always stayed away from or shied away from this notion of personalization as that requires you to use personal information.

Thomas Swanson:
It requires you to use potentially protected health information in order to better serve your customer. That balance between consumer expectation and regulatory compliance is a tough one to maintain. The question actually just came in in our chat pod as well, personalization is great, but how do you manage privacy and security against personalization?

Thomas Swanson:
Scott, I'm going to start with you, and then we'll go to Alan, and then to Tom.

Scott Mowery:
Okay. Yeah. There's a couple pieces there to break down. I would say with the privacy and security aspect of it, I mean, I think for us to be cared ... I mean, we're very careful from an advertising and a marketing standpoint about what kind of data we acquire, how we use the data, who has access to the data whether it'd be internally or externally?

Scott Mowery:
I think it really requires having an ongoing discussion with the other parties in your organization. They're going to need to be involved and not bringing them in the last minute. We talk regularly with our legal staff just to make sure that we're all on the same page that is, if we bring on new technology, everyone's aware of what the technology can do.

Scott Mowery:
Like the points you said, what data are we capturing from this? How do we plan to use the data? Who would be able to see the data? How can we suppress data potentially? Things like that. That's really important. We don't want to have any surprises. Then the other piece for what you're saying with the personalization part, that's still a big challenge for us.

Scott Mowery:
I mean, like you said, you can do some personalization. We can do things with finding a location where we can see that depending on your location on your phone, these will serve the closest locations to you or things like that. I mean, that's pretty straightforward. That's been around for a while. What we have really tried to do is just use our data in other ways to provide a, I guess, a more personalized experience.

Scott Mowery:
One way in which we do that from the patient acquisition standpoint, with our marketing campaigns is using different tools like a Marketo, or things like that, where we can do marketing automation and serve up, as we gather leads, let's say, who are maybe interested in a certain condition, serving up relevant content that we have, that we've produced in other channels within our organization, serving that to them.

Scott Mowery:
It's not quite one-to-one where they come back and remember what you did. But it's saying, "Hey, if you're interested, let's say in epilepsy, we have a boatload of other content that might be of interest to you. We can serve that up." But then we can also use our means to capture data to see, "Hey, what pieces of content do we have that are resonating with our users?

Scott Mowery:
It helps us start to make some ... gather some thoughts as to, "Hey, these kinds of users would generally like seeing this kind of content." We can use our channels like that to serve that to them. But I mean, it's really difficult with that. But it's really, I think maintaining a good relationship, I think, with your legal staff to work through your privacy policy.

Scott Mowery:
Everyone's aware of what the rules are, what are the changes that are coming, like GDPR, and other things like that, and then taking advantage of your content that you have to help personalize an experience.

Thomas Swanson:
Excellent. Thank you, Scott. Alan, I'm going to go to you. I want to play off of something you said earlier that aligns with what Scott said right now. Alan, you mentioned earlier tailoring the content to the particular channel. Where if it's educational, that can be basically sent out via an email. You're using marketing automation tool like Marketo, or you could serve that up based on location indicators and things like that based on the IP address of the user.

Thomas Swanson:
But if it's something that is actually clinical, or tied to a diagnosis, you put that behind the authentication of a portal where the patient essentially has to give consent to access that information. How important is that delineation of channel and the content that's delivered via the channels to achieving personalization?

Alan Tam:
Yeah. I think it's a critical part. I think Scott said it best, there's internally within an organization, whether you're payer healthcare system, there's going to be a lot of tragedies to figure out in terms of who has access to content, what do you want to do with that content? Channels behaviors, definitely come into play. Once this is determined, I mean, there's the content piece when it comes to personalization relevance, that's where folks like Tom Hileman and his agency can really come into play and help elevate the effectiveness of the content pieces that's delivered through each channel.

Alan Tam:
With our system, you can actually determine, leverage the preferences that perhaps healthcare consumers may have said they want the type of content delivered by. Also, there's different types of rules and regulations that the SEC has established through TCPA, as an example, in terms of what type of information can be delivered without necessarily having opt in.

Alan Tam:
But definitely the point that you made, Tom, in regards to PHI and HIPAA requirements, we can also leverage technology to push content to a portal, where authentication is needed before a healthcare consumer can access that information. I think ultimately, when we're thinking about a holistic campaign, it's about delivering that, Scott mentioned this, in terms of pieces of content across all different types of channels that are relevant and dynamic.

Alan Tam:
Something as simple as a dynamic newsletter, for example, Tom, your newsletter is going to be a little bit different than mine than Tom Hileman's than Scott based on what our conditions are and what we're interested in. For example, if you already know that my entire family has already received both COVID vaccines, maybe you don't need to talk about that to me anymore. You can focus on other conditions or [inaudible 00:29:12] that I myself am on.

Alan Tam:
In terms of the different channels that I interact with, our system as an example, can actually leverage and collect that behavioral information in terms of Alan really engages with email versus text versus whatever other channels that I choose to engage with. In terms of getting some consensus, in terms of sharing information, I think Tom Hileman and his group have developed great things.

Alan Tam:
Tom, I think you mentioned things like landing pages, health risk assessment forums, et cetera, that basically entices and engages the patient to learn more. Once they opt to learn more, that's signaling intent for more content that can be shared. I think there's a lot of different strategies there. Technology in this case is one piece. We're just one piece of the solution that paves the way for both Scott and Tom to build on top of with the right type of content.

Thomas Swanson:
Awesome. Thank you, Alan. Now, Tom, I want to spin off of something that Alan just said, which is given your experience with all of the different payers and providers that you work with, the importance of integrating and aligning the different channels, and the content that gets delivered through those channels, how critical is that cross channel personalization to customer acquisition, and ultimately building customer loyalty?

Tom Hileman:
Well, I'd say it's incredibly important. I mean, we live in an omni-channel world. If you think about even with pandemic has changed that [inaudible 00:31:12] change accelerated that. Folks, I mean, we're interacting with mobile applications, mobile devices, web browsers, email within that social media within all those pieces. We're very much in an omni-channel world.

Tom Hileman:
Our experience then not even getting into if we were in the B2C space of shopping and all those aspects will stay in the healthcare piece. People expect unified experiences, much like Amazon is delivering a shopping cart that if you add something on your mobile device, those app when you log in on your web browser, and the same thing, people expect that you're going to know them, [inaudible 00:31:44] those pieces.

Tom Hileman:
I would say it's incredibly important. Obviously, we need to temper that a bit in healthcare with those privacy concerns. I think Scott and both Alan mentioned, we live in an opt-in world and the no surprise world. If you think about the patients and the providers and folks that we interact with met plan members, they don't want to be surprised. They want personalization, but not surprises.

Tom Hileman:
That's where as our general rule of thumb on there. But yeah, the omni-channel experience is incredibly important. That's why having that centralized database, have a centralized technology that manages within that, those preferences that Alan alluded to are incredibly important, because if we're getting people that actually put their preferences in, giving their consent that way, there's much more likelihood of high engagement, and then high progression through our customer journeys that we put together.

Thomas Swanson:
Awesome. Thank you, Tom. Now, gentlemen and audience, we have seven minutes left. I would highly encourage anybody that has any questions for the panel to put those questions into Q&A, the Q&A pod [Renee 00:32:56] did. As we're waiting for those questions to populate, give them an avenue of quick round-robin with all of you.

Thomas Swanson:
We've touched upon, I think, some big topics here regarding accelerated pace of change, the importance of aligning digital channels with physical channels, the importance of not only collecting data, but that using it and governing access to the data in ways that serve both your organization and your customers, and then how that personalization can help drive customer loyalty and acquiring new customers and things like that.

Thomas Swanson:
What do you see, say, in the next 12 months? If you can look into your crystal ball, Tom, and say, what we've seen in the last year and a half, this is what I think is going to stay, this is what's transitory, or this is what I think might be the big thing coming in the next year in the industry.

Tom Hileman:
I think a few things that we're going to see in the next 12 to 18 months, one is I think we're going to see a continued consolidation in the MarTech world, AdTech, MarTech. We can't continue to grow at 8,000 plus companies if people can't make sense of it. Us as healthcare marketers across the payers, providers side, and patients, there's just too much out there. I think one thing we'll see in industry is that consolidation.

Tom Hileman:
Do I think we're finally going to see AI turn from theoretical to actionable? Historically, people are saying they're using AI and maybe they're using it a little bit for bidding strategies, and PPC, and maybe they're using it a little bit for optimizing content. But I think we're going to see AI come to the front as we, two, increase the personalization of the experience and also to better utilize limited resources and budgets that we have within the marketing department.

Tom Hileman:
We're held to the fire to give measurable results. One of the ways that we're going to optimize that is to be able to use machine learning for that. I think the third thing is we're going to continue to see the moving to the seamlessly integrated world of data. We've seen a lot of progression of that over the last 18 months. But I think that'll be one of the themes. I think we live in an integrated omni-channel world.

Tom Hileman:
It's only going to become more seamless across that and the expectations healthcare customers, however, we wanted to find that from the payer, provider to the patient's side are all going to be what they have in the traditional retail and business world that we live in. That integration, seamlessness is going to become ... go beyond expected to demanded what we've delivered and help.

Thomas Swanson:
Thank you, Tom. Now, we've got a couple questions that came into the Q&A pod. But Scott and Alan, I want to give you guys a quick moment to look into your crystal balls as well. Scott, next 12 to 18 months for Cleveland.

Scott Mowery:
Yeah. I mean, I think that I would echo some of what Tom said with data. I mean, I think that is there's more and more with privacy concerns, and restrictions on what can be gathered, what can be used. It's really trying to think of the data that you are able to collect, how can you utilize it more effectively? I think that's one piece.

Scott Mowery:
The other piece is for us is trying to use AI in ways that ... or like Tom's before, things with scale is how can we use that to help allow us to come to decisions about what consumers are wanting. We look at that. Look for things like our call tracking capabilities to see that as people are calling and making appointments, that we're able to designate that that call did lead to an appointment without having a market or doing anything to either listen to conversations or things like that to determine what actually happened.

Scott Mowery:
There's some training involved with that. You have to have the resources to do that. But I think the area with data just getting more comfortable with what you can measure and optimize on is going to be critical for us as we go forward.

Thomas Swanson:
Thank you, Scott. Alan?

Alan Tam:
Yeah. I think both Scott and Tom have hit the nail on the head. I'll just share with you the data and the AI side. That's going to be a continued, I think, trend, and area of adoption and significant growth that we see over the next 12, 18 months. From our perspective and our clients, we've seen patients who have been identified with our clinical AI models are 10 times more likely to make an appointment.

Alan Tam:
We can track that all down from engagement, conversion, and finally, to not only appointment but also diagnosis as well. I think metrics also becomes when you're talking about new numbers. Not only acquisition or retention, where you can talk about metrics like ROI and revenue growth, we're also trying to track in terms of life saved, life touched, quality of life years improved.

Alan Tam:
That becomes increasingly important as we moved into value-based care world for healthcare organizations and payers to be able to have that type of impact with the data that they have, with the content that they outreach to the healthcare consumer.

Thomas Swanson:
Excellent. Thank you, Alan. We've got a couple questions here that pertain to marketers and how you make data available to marketers. I want to toss this out to whoever wants to answer. It's just how do you connect the data that you're collecting to the marketers that actually want to use that data? How do you help them understand what data you have and the best ways to use it in a compliant manner?

Scott Mowery:
Yeah. I would say from our side, a big thing for us is the work that our ... We have a data science team at Cleveland Clinic, and they are so important for what we do from a measurement standpoint, because as we mentioned before, we're capturing data, but we're capturing it in different places. We have our lead data that we get through our marketing campaigns.

Scott Mowery:
When people actually become patients, we have patient information, financial information about payer mix and things like that. Well, there are all these different sources. How do we bring that together? Our data science team is able to marry up information and bring it all into one data warehouse. I think that investment that we made years ago was critical for us.

Scott Mowery:
Because now we're able to take that data, put it into dashboard, show it in areas like Tableau to our different teams. Not just marketing, but other people who do need the data to be more effective in what they do. For us, that was critical for us for connecting the dots on certain things like what we see with our campaigns of tying back these leads that were captured from a paid search campaign to actual patients, what contribution margin they make.

Scott Mowery:
Geographically, where they're from, where their visits occurred, all that is tied together, but it's brought together into one data warehouse through our data science team than for any organization. I mean, that's a critical piece to have.

Thomas Swanson:
Thank you, Scott. Another question from Madison regarding a preference center. Tom or Alan, she asked what types of metrics or information should you leverage in order to make a case for building a preference center, because a preference center is a key component in delivering upon doer or customer expectations? What are the key determining factors as to whether a preference center should be invested in or not?

Tom Hileman:
Alan, you want that or do you like me to say ...

Alan Tam:
You're close to customer. Why don't you start and I'll add to it?

Tom Hileman:
Sure, no problem. I think when I think about when you make an investment for a preference center, it really comes down to a couple things, customer segmentation. How many different types of customers do you have? Then relative to that, there are types of customers, and customer interests. Preference center really allows the person to slice of the content or how you're going to interact them based on interest and who they are as a customer type. You got to first look at that.

Tom Hileman:
In terms of justifying it for the investment, A, it's typically not a very expensive investment overall. I mean, most of the marketing automation platforms have basic level put into it. It's pretty straightforward to stand up. But really, it comes down to me, is your content ready for that?

Tom Hileman:
If I'm going to ask Tom for his preferences around maybe the certain diseases and conditions or institutes or wellness or things like that, there's an expectation that we're going to have content that we can deliver to that. I would tell folks that the investments typically not that large.

Tom Hileman:
That's not the biggest issue. But the real investment comes into personalized content, personalized experiences, and journeys, going to take the time to build the preference center we got to pay it off. That's where I would start at active of, are we content ready and journey ready to support those different preference?

Thomas Swanson:
Awesome. Thank you, Tom. Hey, Alan, one question for you, and then we're going to wrap things up. It's a question specifically about AI and machine learning. Is how do you recommend the payer get started using AI to drive consumer insights if they're not doing it already? Sure. It sounds good to talk about using AI in order to help you parse through your data, but where do you start?

Alan Tam:
Right. I think taking a look at your audience segments, our AI models, for example, I think of it as a audience builder on steroids. When you take a look at your data sets, and your members, where's the opportunity, where's the most impact that you can make, where's from a cost savings perspective, from an impact perspective? That will help guide you in the right direction of what you should be doing.

Alan Tam:
We have amazing dashboards from an AI perspective in terms of segmenting out your audiences, and then being able to inject your own operational objectives in there to help you identify how, where to start value of a particular audience segment. Then making sure that you're plugged into and training the AI models on the local data that you have. That's where majority of our clients start today.

Scott Mowery:
Tom, if I could jump in for a second, I guess, I'll be a little precise or directive here. If I were starting out from the payer side, I look for Care Gaps. I look at areas where the people aren't getting the care that they need or annual wellness or chronic conditions that they may not be managing as well as they could be. I think those are huge value, because, A, we can take care of people which reduces the long-term costs from a payer side of things and is also doing good by folks.

Scott Mowery:
Care Gaps are a great place to start. I know Alan's AI models also help identify those pieces of where those things are missing. That's a real high value place to start when you come into AI machine learning.

Thomas Swanson:
Okay.

Alan Tam:
Let me also add on to that really quickly, especially for Care gaps for folks who have not been identified. These are folks that are at risk who have not been identified, and already in those Care Gap workflows that EHR may already be plugged into.

Thomas Swanson:
Okay. Thank you. Gentlemen, as always, we've run out of time. I thoroughly appreciate the conversation and the discussion here. I think it was great. We hit upon all of the key things that I was hoping to as well as diving a little deeper to some of the important topics. Alan, Tom, Scott, thank you very much for your time today. We have one question still in the chat pod. Kyle, I'll make sure that we get an answer for you directly back to you from this team of experts.

Thomas Swanson:
But thanks everybody today for your time. I hope you found it to be time well spent. Scott, Alan, thank you very much, until next time.

Scott Mowery:
Thanks, Tom.

Tom Hileman:
Thank you.

Alan Tam:
Here. Thank you.

Scott Mowery:
Bye.

Tom Hileman:
Bye.

Monique Belcher:
Thank you, everyone. Thanks to all of our panelists today. This now concludes our session. You may now disconnect.

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