Physician Outreach Leading COVID-19 Revenue Recovery

Webinar

Featuring

Barlow McCarthy logo

Description

COVID19 is forcing a new normal for providers and everyone in the health system who facilitates their experiences.


The current environment is driving a catastrophic revenue gap, provider burnout, and anxious communities & populations.


Learning Objectives: Accelerate from strategy to physician relations execution in 2 weeks.


Hear a discussion with physician relations experts from Barlow/McCarthy, Legacy Health, and Intermountain Healthcare on closing the gaps in this change:


  • Remaining Relevant: What you can do now
  • Operations: From reducing provider burnout to recapturing growth
  • What the future holds for the provider relations experience: Managing scarce resources across the health enterprise and prioritizing outreach will require data-driven planning, flawless execution, and relentless communication

Kriss Barlow

Kriss Barlow

Principal
Barlow/McCarthy

Barlow McCarthy logo
Darren Burch

Darren Burch

Physician Outreach Liaison
Legacy Health

Legacy Health
Robert Perkins

Robert Perkins

Outreach Services Director
Intermountain Healthcare

Intermointain Healthcare
Chris Hemphill

Chris Hemphill

Director of Client AI & Operations
Actium Health

Actium Health
1

Transcript

Chris Hemphill: First of all, we wanted to thank everybody for hopping on with us. It’s a great topic and the data that we look at every day, points to the physician relationship being the most important part of the healthcare consumer experience. Because of that, we see physician outreach as the key to giving physicians what they need to deliver great patient experiences for increasing patient expectations. This is especially true as they suffer unprecedented burnout and change due to COVID-19. We’ve gathered today’s speakers to have a dialogue on what it takes to adjust right now and the new reality that’s being formed today. To help with that dialogue, we encourage you to use the question and answer features of the Zoom software. We’ve highlighted where that is. It should appear on the bottom of your screen. And in addition to that, we’ve got great questions and survey responses from the audience already from the registration login poll. And we’re just feeling a great energy coming from this group. So, we’ll share those questions and answers and we’ll have a live session where you get to interact at the very end of the session. But before we begin, I wanted to hand it off to one of our panelists Daniel Neiman. Daniel Neiman who is with the with HMPS. Daniel would you- Daniel Neiman: Thank Chris. On behalf of the team at the Forum For Healthcare Strategists, Jen, Judy, Debbie, Krista and me, as well as our partners at Symphony RM and Barbara McCarthy, welcome and thanks for fitting us into your busy schedules. We understand that you are all deep in the throws of COVID-19, so this time is especially precious. Right now we think the best thing we can do for you is to provide realtime information from your expert friends and colleagues across the country. We’ve turned to some of the best and brightest to talk about what they are seeing, hearing and experiencing and to offer advice for planning physician outreach post-COVID-19. The conversation will be led by Chris Hemphill from SymphonyRM and will include Kriss Barlow of Barlow McCarthy, Darren Burch from Legacy health and Robert Perkins from Intermountain Healthcare. Looking ahead before him is additional opportunities plan to help physician relations, marketing and strategy executives navigate through the pandemic and beyond. First the healthcare marketing and physician strategy summit has been rescheduled to August 17 to 19 at the Swiss Hotel in Chicago. Of course, we’ll be continuously watching and reassessing the situation. If it does not seem best to proceed, we won’t, watch for details coming soon. And for those of you who are members of the forum, we’ll be starting regular Zoom chats. The first one will be soon and we’ll focus on leading physician relations. Stay tuned for more information. With that I’ll turn the program back over to Chris. Chris Hemphill: Thank you very much Daniel and we look forward to seeing you guys and all the work that you’re doing in August. Now, just to kick things off we asked a survey poll when you were logging in on how is physician outreach vital to recovery efforts? And we got all kinds of different answers and we saw some common themes among those answers such as relationships and communication and establishing community. And then if you look a little bit deeper, you’ll see things like competition and reestablishing business processes. There were a lot of good responses. We picked three that really stood out to us. There’s the concept… These really matched the theme of what we’re discussing today, which one is reestablishing relationships and feelings of safety among patients. Reestablishing community and care partnerships. Prudence, that’s from Lisa Potter from Kittitas Valley Health Care. Another one that we though was really powerful because it’s really focused on what we can do right now is that it’s critical to gain back lost business in terms of surgeries and procedures that have been lost to competitors and communicating. I love these last few words. We’re open for business. And third, we got one from Casey Norton at Beacon health system. Can offer immediate lift in several areas, surgery, imaging, what have you, if messaging is executed seamlessly. Also a very important thing to consider is how messaging is executed and whether or not that’s well coordinated. We have people who have been through those challenges before on this call. And we hope that these themes that these people have brought up bleed over into what you’re getting out of the presentation today. As far as objectives, what we’re hoping that you come out strongest with is approaches, you’re going to be hearing from people who are out there in the field. Approaches that you can take and use right now, a good perspective on executive leadership, how to build value for them and what they’re thinking and preparation for the future of the role. The way that we want to accomplish that is through this agenda here is, we had our speakers come up with some short introductory presentations, then they’re going to go into a panel with some prepared questions. We’ll discuss some key takeaways that we prepared and then we’ll have the portion where your questions are. I’ll already see questions rolling in and questions from the initial survey. We’ll address those live. And for those that we can’t get to on this call today, we’ll email those directly and address those later after the call. For an overall introduction to our speakers, we have Kriss Barlow who leads a major physician liaison training firm. Darren Birch who is an acting outreach liaison at Legacy Health and Robert Perkins who heads up outreach efforts at Intermountain Healthcare. We want to give each of them an opportunity to deep dive and cover important broad perspective on how outreach is transforming. What we’ll do, we’ll start with Kriss Barlow. Kriss is principal at Barlow McCarthy, which is the firm that prepares outreach teams such as physician engagement, as the environment’s becoming increasingly data driven. She also leads an online community for outreach professionals to support each other and discuss post-COVID-19 approaches. Kriss’ covers the entire process. She covers strategic planning from the leadership level to sales training and engagement tactics. She’s worked with health systems large and small, and she has a track record of delivering in uncertain situations. That’s among the many reasons that we were really happy to get a conversation with Kriss. Kriss, to kick it off let’s start with the question that we asked our audience during polling. How is provider outreach uniquely vital right now and in times to come? Kriss might be on mute. There we go. Kriss, it’s okay, I think I might’ve had you on mute. Kriss Barlow: Thank you. Thanks Chris. And thanks for the opportunity. Hey, it’s no surprise to hear from me or any of the colleagues that are on the phone today. Physician relations is always important, but I got to say never more so than today. The other thing that I would say is, it’s not a time for us to ease back into this. There is so much being written right now about the fragile nature of recovery. Money is more than tight. Many of you know liaisons who have been impacted. I have seen three consumer research studies in the last week. Every one of them has indicated that our patients maybe aren’t as willing to rush back as we’d hope they’d be. Client and partner survey said a third of our patients don’t plan to reschedule anytime soon. They’re going to watch and wait and see how this evolves. Obviously, implications for the hospitals, certainly for our doctors, and of course for the strategy for physician relations. As I look at… Today is about our ability, number one to tell the story with a physician perceptions internally. I think it’s about our ability to fine tune those relationships. And third, to begin planning to support the organization’s growth needs. The growth piece is going to be more important than ever in my mind. So, first I want to call out those elements that are vital today, then we can circle back a little bit and my colleagues are also going to offer some great perspectives on that future state planning, which of course is way more fun than this gap period we’re in. Most teams I think, did an excellent job with that crisis launch phase. That time when there was immediate practice shutdowns, we needed to shift to virtual care. There were tremendous demands for timely and accurate information. I think we’ve moved beyond that gap now. And so, practices are marginally functioning. The immediate needs were met and we’re pretty eager for what’s next. If a rep or a leader were to ask me about this gap time, I would suggest there’s six components that are going to fill the gap. Those areas need attention right now. The first is really to extend your current COVID plan. Many of you started with a 30-day plan based on the market and how your organization has deployed you, put the next 30 days into a plan. If a leader says, what are you doing for the next 30 days? That ability to be able to bring out that plan and show it. It’s going to include the daily activity, the ongoing capture of that proactive voice of the physician, but it’s also very intentional about calling out next future state. Number two, I think it’s all about amping up our outreach phone calls and notes. Again, we’ve moved beyond what do you need? Now, it’s starting to capture that planning on the other side. What’s going on in your practice? What concerns? What patient voice are you hearing, doctor? And those of you who are team leaders, there’s no reason you can’t do a ride along via a phone call to listen in on these and hear some of that voice of customer. I also think we really need to capture those insights on how they’re managing those current patients with cancer, heart disease, what they’re doing with their chronic diabetes patients, our ability to listen and report internally, but also to give them immediate feedback on how we can handle these via the phone. Number three for me is really to refine your tracking. Many of you have done this, but if you haven’t, what a fabulous time to make sure your tracking is streamlined, it’s effective and it’s functional before we’re back in the field full time. And one of the pieces of this for me is make sure there’s consistency across the team. Take a team approach to this rather than an individualized approach. Fourth, likewise, let’s get our reports looking like they should. And taking the time to make sure that reports not only tell what we think they should hear, but what those internal leaders expect from us. An ask on that. Number five is a bit selfish for all of you. That ability to figure out some ways to stay motivated with doing this, I think for some of us, you have a great day and then you might have a not so great day. Finding a plan in a way to make sure that you’re personally motivated. You get to those things every day. Some focus in the morning rather than saying, “I’m going to do those calls tomorrow,” just do them today. Just take that on. And the last piece, number six is I think the crux of where physician relations really needs to be. And it’s that planning for where the organization’s priority needs are going to take us. Make sure you’ve got number one good content background to make sure you clinically ready to do that. If not, take the time to do it. But the most important piece of this to me is beginning to look at your growth plan for the organization as it shifts out of the lockdown. Setting some good goals that add value for the practice and for the internal stakeholders. Ask the question, what would I like to learn from the practices in my first three months back in the field? How am I going to get that information? And how are we going to use it? So, that’s my six to fill the gap for today. Chris Hemphill: Thank you very much, Kriss. Very good insights there. And we’ll go to Darren next. Darren Birch comes to us as a Healthcare Strategist and a Physician Outreach Liaison from Legacy Health. Legacy is based on a Portland, Oregon, six hospitals and more than 70 primary specialty and urgent care clinics. Legacy has more than 3,000 providers that are either employed on medical staff or involved in their partner network. Darren takes on a data driven approach to nurturing and growing these relationships and he’s a thought leader in this space. For you, Darren, given all the change, how are you as a physician liaison seeing how healthcare delivery could change? And what are your ideas on how the role can remain vital? And also what do you see as the role for data and analytics? Darren Burch: I think the biggest thing about our role in particular as physician liaisons to really make yourself essential. And the idea around this is, don’t react to change but lead and be the change, be involved in the change. There’s been massive and rapid changes in the market. CMS the Center for Medicaid and Medicare services has streamlined and approved many things and lifted regulations so quickly. And I’m going to rifle through just a few of these that I think that are important to us moving forward. Number one, approval of telemedicine video visits and paying for an 80 additional services in telemedicine. That’s huge. That’s going to change the way that we practice. There more frequent telemedicine visits are going to be approved. CMS is approving healthcare beyond hospital walls, hospital-based services, which are typically known as hospital-based services could be provided elsewhere. And I’ll talk about this a little bit more in a second. Ambulatory surgery centers can now contract with local healthcare systems to provide services such as cancer procedures or trauma surgeries and other essential surgeries. Think of it this way, you break your tibia or fibula and while playing underdog volleyball. You could be transferred to an outpatient surgery center and not a hospital. Interesting, huh? What goes along with this is ambulances now have been approved to transport patients to a wider range of locations like physicians offices, urgent care facilities, ambulatory surgery centers. That’s a game changer. Medicare will pay for laboratory technicians to collect specimens out of beneficiaries home. And this is for COVID-19. But will this be lifted in the future? Probably not. Will this be expanded? Can we collect specimens more than just COVID-19? Probably. CMS has increased reimbursement for critical care patients for COVID. For COVID patients, there’s been a 20% bump. Could this expand to other infectious diseases or other pieces of care, critical care, medicine where it’s very resource intensive? Possibly CMS is also temporarily eliminating paperwork. What? Eliminating paperwork, allowing physicians to spend more time with patients. Again, huge. All these changes and there’s a lot more. I recommend that you go to the website there that I have on the source and on CMS website to look at all the changes they’ve made. And I think, one of the biggest changes of course is in hospitals and healthcare systems. Hospitals are really quickly learning how to become nimble and they’re learning how to quickly make decisions. I know in Legacy Health we are making decisions that would normally take a year of planning to make. And we’re making them in a day or two days. We’re streamlining policies, procedures, and processes. We’re focusing on productivity of our staff, of our physical plants, office space and essential operations. We’re looking at supplies and how we utilize them and how we’re reusing them, to save dollars. On the next slide, many furloughed staff because most hospitals are actually not very busy right now. We’re furloughing staff and we’re not as busy in the hospitals and we’re learning how to run very lean. From an organizational perspective, this is a perfect time for a healthcare organization to restructure and retool what you’re doing. This is where liaisons really need to find an essential place. There’s been a huge buildup of elective surgeries. What’s going to happen when we start doing more elective surgeries? What’s going to happen after that? After we’ve worked through that backlog. Strategic planning has been in hyper-drive. What will that look like moving forward? Strategic implementation, implementing those strategic plans has also been in work speed. Are we going to continue this? This is a very lean structure that we’re working in. I think what’s important in the future for liaisons is strategic planning, strategic service line planning. Get yourself involved in that, supporting and executing those strategic plans. We are the people to help do that. Population health, one thing to think about, it’s going to change. How might that change? Are there going to be alternate payment strategies? Healthcare delivery is already looking different, it’s going to more virtual, more outpatient and we’re triaging critical care and emergent patients in a different way. And all through this data analytics is going to be so important. So important in identifying patients for population health, what strategies we can use for them and also how we look back on how we and where we’re getting our business and how we’re planning to grow. Lastly, we have to, as liaisons think across the continuum. We can’t think about sales and strategy anymore, just sales and strategy and trying to grow a business. We have to think about operations, we have to think about population health. We have to think about payment strategies. We are going to have to learn more about our organizations and how we do business. Chris Hemphill: Thank you very much for those insights, Darren. And we’re all excited to hear a little bit deeper in the Q and A panel. Now, we have Robert Perkins. Robert directs physician outreach for Intermountain Healthcare. Intermountain Healthcare is internationally recognized, not-for-profit health system with 24 hospitals, 215 medical group clinics, 2,400 employee providers, 4,000 affiliated providers, and approximately 40,000 caregivers. Since taking over the 40 team member outreach services department, Robert has led a data science driven transformation that has nearly doubled for each contribution and developed tracking and reporting that’s vital to senior leadership today. For you, Robert, we’ve spoken at length on outreach value to leadership and that’s going to be a key focus of our upcoming talk at HMPS. What should executives expect of their outreach teams right now? And what can we expect? And how can we align [inaudible 00:20:37] with leadership? Robert Perkins: Yeah, thanks Chris. It’s a privilege to be part of the webinar today. This is such a unique time that we’re going through and experiencing with this pandemic. And I know that many people on the call may be effected negatively because of this pandemic, whether that’s personally affected or professionally affected. And I hope that any adverse impacts that it’s having on you personally and professionally are short lived. I’m privileged to speak with Kriss Barlow and with Darren experts in their fields. And I’ve known Chris for years and her knowledge and expertise is second to none. The information that we’re sharing on this webinar’s meant to be very general and not specific to your situation. Hopefully, you can take some of the information and adapt it to your situation and your geography and to your organization and make it helpful to you and your specific circumstances. Those of you that have heard me speak before, know that I’m a really big advocate for positioning the outreach or physician relations department appropriately with senior leadership. And that includes giving reports and giving them the right data, the right context of the data and driving value for the department. But it also includes positioning the department as a value generating department or arm of the organization, not just a volume driving department or arm of the organization. As we move more quickly into a population health or an at risk environment, volume for those patient types, volume becomes secondary to utilization management. And if the outreach department is seen solely as volume generating experts, then that as volume becomes less important for certain patient populations, the department may become less important to the C-suite and more irrelevant at least in overall strategy. By positioning the department as a value generating, it doesn’t matter what the value is, it certainly includes driving volumes, but it also includes driving appropriate utilization and appropriate utilization management can drive all sorts of other things that the C-suites sees as value drivers for the organization. And so, we’ve done that over the last few years. The outreach department has been included on many key initiatives that our senior leadership sees as value drivers for our organization. Things that outreach may not typically be included in. Those are some operational things that certainly Telehealth, population health, other things, they see us as a value driver for the organization. And it’s been key in getting us involved and included and a seat at the table in those meetings. We didn’t foresee this pandemic coming. We didn’t have our crystal ball out, but we didn’t anticipate what kind of value our C-suite would need right now during the pandemic in the short term, but also in the longterm what’s coming and what our leadership is they restrategize and rethink about things in this new world. What’s valuable to them. And again, we’re being brought to the table on that. A few things that we’ve done here. And that I think are key, not just during the pandemic, but as we move forward afterwards some things that we’re doing and that are bringing value to our C-suite, short term and longterm, we’re providing insight and information on the referring market to the suite. Many clinics and referral sources are really struggling and furloughing staff and decreasing the size of their staff. They’re laying people off and they’re in great distress themselves. They’re going to be looking for resources. Right now, they may be looking for information, but they’re going to be looking for resources to help them be more efficient in the longterm and they’re going to need to partner with facilities hospitals that can really help them be efficient. It may include things like online scheduling or patient self scheduling pre-authorization services for service lines that may not be offering pre-authorization services now. Extended hours of operation, anything related to access may be that extended surgical suite hours. Whatever that may be, they’re going to look to partner with hospitals that can ramp up the way that the referring sources need to ramp up. C-suite leaders are probably going to need to invest in some of these resources and they may not know what they need to invest in. And right now especially with cash flow the way it is, it’s going to be difficult to get some commitment from the executive team on investments, but helping them understand the opportunities and what the referring community is going to need here in the short term, may help them realize that this is an opportunity to really step up the game, invest where needed, if that’s an online scheduling tools or whatever that may be, invest appropriately to make sure that we come out of this strong and capitalize on opportunities and the referring market. I think the opportunity to provide insight to the C-suite and help them commit can’t be underestimated. A way that this maybe, they may want to consider looking at this is taking your credentialed provider lists and comparing that to volumes over the past year, year and a half, two years to see what credentialed providers are highly aligned with you and what credentialed providers aren’t. And take that to the C-suite and say this is a great opportunity to increase alignment with providers that at one time may have been aligned but they haven’t been recently. Really, reach out to those providers and see if you can capitalize on this opportunity. I think there’s also going to be some real strong opportunities coming out of this for some joint ventures, some partnerships, affiliations and even acquisitions and helping the C-suite understand those opportunities, not just that there will be the opportunities, but you may be able to bring a lot of insight into what practices or entities would be strong opportunities for an affiliation or partnership or joint venture or even an acquisition. Looking at those opportunities and determining what’s most valuable, bringing that to the C-suite I think is a great opportunity right now. I think we can also increase alignment with referring practices and facilities. There’s a strong likelihood that referral patterns are going to change and probably change significantly in the near future with coming out of the pandemics or out of the quarantine. And habits are going to be broken, referral habits, those kinds of things. We can jump in and provide high levels of service and really step up the game there and increase that alignment with referring practices. I also think developing a really focused outreach strategy is right now, Darren mentioned this as well as stepping in and making sure that you’re not relying on the C-suite to develop that strategy, but you develop it and get their support and buy in. And you can be seen as a real resource and an asset and get your seat at the table if needed. The executive leaders are trying to stop the bleed right now with cash flow and they’re focused on so many operational things that they can even be paralyzed. And I think if you can step up the game with some strategy, it will be highly advantageous for you. And then last is data. I’m a big believer in using data to drive our outreach efforts, make everything as objective as you can and also subjective measures need to be looked at as well. But really try to objectify it for those C-suite help you gain credibility. We’re anticipating, I know our executive leaders, I know what they’re going to want and what they’re going to be looking for as we come out of this. They’re going to want to see, really a new baseline with the pre-COVID to post-COVID volume changes. We’re going to be looking that. We’re already creating reports to track referral patterns with providers before the pandemic and after the pandemic and going to watch and see how much we can capitalize. We’re really stepping up our game right now with providing information to the referring providers. We’re sharing as much information as we can without breaking any stark laws or anti-kickback regulations. We’re providing as much information to the referral sources right now. Some of them are operational processes and procedures, some of them are even HR, human resource related. And we’re getting that alignment right now by sharing what the providers need. And then as we come out of this, we’re anticipating and projecting greater alignment, both with our employed physicians as well as our affiliated physicians. The employed physicians that may be leaking referrals outside of the system, we’re anticipating capturing more of that as we come out of this. With the affiliated, we’re anticipating some significant volume growth because we’re improving alignment during this time. But that’s what I have Chris. And I think that again, those four points are some key things that you can do to increase that alignment and create the value with your C-suite. Chris Hemphill: Thank you Robert. I think those points is something that could be a talk in and of itself. So, thank you for sharing that. And actually you’ve got some really good questions that we’ll be able to jump into towards the end of the call based on the points that you brought up. We really appreciate it. What we’re going to do next, is we’re going to move into the panel portion of this. This is based on prepared questions that walk us through these main themes so that you can hear each person’s perspective on things like the day-to-day life and communicating executive metrics and focus. With that, I will stop the screen share and we’ll jump directly into questions. Give me one second. All right, so starting out with our questions. Question number one, I’m going to start with Darren on this question. Given shelter in place restrictions, given the restrictions that we have on travel, how should outreach professionals be structuring day-to-day? What should be everybody’s day-to-day in this environment? Darren Burch: Well, I think number one, just from our normal job we can, as Robert and Kriss Barlow had said, we can still do our normal job and do a lot of outreach and communication. I think this is a perfect time. There’s so many providers actually across the US that aren’t busy and they’re available. And so, they would love to take your call so get them on the phone and ask what their plans are, ask what they see in the future. Ask how they see better alignment with your hospital, especially if they’re an independent group. Get their ideas. I think that’s a wonderful way to spend your time now. And another one is asking your leadership, either your direct leadership or above your leadership, as a team, where can we fit? What are your priorities? Where are we going? What do you see? And then interject, “Hey, we think we can fit here. We think we can fit there.” I think that’s going to be a really key piece, moving forward in our roles. Chris Hemphill: Excellent. Kriss, care to give any feedback? What are your thoughts on the question, given these restrictions, given the restrictions on travel? And this question has come up, people have been asking on Zoom meetings and things like that. What are your thoughts on that? Kriss Barlow: Yeah, so Darren’s right on with that. Physicians have been overwhelmingly receptive to having liaisons reach out. What I would say is you need to be more prepared rather than less when you’re doing these phone calls. A good agenda, it’s not how you do and we need to move on with that. And we need to have meaty conversations with them. I would say, put a percentage of your time in your calendar spending to do the outreach calls. Audience number one for me right now is all those retention docs, those docs that have been fairly loyal. Make sure that they’re nurtured. And then the second piece is keeping apprised of all the splitters and especially those independents, they have not had the safety net that they’ve wanted. I would absolutely encourage using the phone, picking up the phone, doing the phone calls. Virtual meetings have been pretty effective for a lot of organizations connecting specialists to primary cares. Again, they have availability. And for any of you who have new docs who you’ve needed to onboard, the Zoom meetings or virtual meetings have been a great place to do some onboarding in lieu of making it happen. Last thing, I would say is, if you’ve been needing to get some more clinical content from some of your surgeons or other specialists, it’s a great time for a team to set up a virtual meeting, reach out to some of those specialists. Again, those surgeons have time. Let’s reach out and get some good clinical content from our physicians to help us prepare for the next step. Chris Hemphill: Robert, your thoughts and we’re actually getting additional questions following onto to that question. The question of how should we be spending our time day-to-day, but also how soon is too soon to start visiting practices once shelter in place is lifted? Robert Perkins: I think a lot of it… When we can start visiting offices is dependent upon the local geography and the local state level or even city or county level restrictions. It’s difficult to say, a rubber stamp and I think it’s probably going to be a dial, not a light switch that we just turn on, but we need to dial up and still figure out how to operate somewhat remotely or virtually as we dial that back in. But also that we ought to be the examples as we were going from office to office, make sure our teams are practicing all of the social distancing behaviors that are being promoted. Day-to-day, I think it’s… I’ve been a little bit surprised at how busy our team has been during this quarantine. When we first went into the quarantine, we actually planned to have our team do a number of different operational items, including some audits of our CRM and other things. But we’ve had really good relationships with our clinical programs and our service lines and they’ve been asking us to do more and more virtual visits with our providers. We’ve done a number of peer-to-peers virtually, over WebEx and Zoom. We’ve done a number of those types of visits distributing campaign information and relevant information to providers offices. And we’ve actually been quite busy. I think that you can work with your different clinical programs and service lines to find out what messages they would like to deliver during the pandemic as well as, as we come back out. And make the calls that we’ve all been talking about with intent. Like Kriss said, it’s not necessarily just making a call and checking in and seeing how you’re doing and just trying to touch base, but have some kind of an intent and you’ll bring more value. Chris Hemphill: Excellent. Thank you very much. We’ll go to the next question. We see that many services, there’s little of a cross over here, but many services are being furloughed while others are spiking so much that it’s creating burdens and overwork and hardship for the physician community. Given those two extremes, how are teams approaching this? And we’ll flip it over. Robert, would you mind taking this one first? Robert Perkins: Yeah, sure. I think there’s two ways to look at that. One is how are the operational teams handling that? Because they’re the clinicians, some of them are overwhelmed and some of them are looking for work. We’ve redeployed a lot. We’ve really deployed a lot of those providers, even specialists to support our teleservices. So, operationally we can do that. When we’re talking about the outreach teams, I guess, it does go back to the first question a little bit on ensuring that we have, thinking creatively on the work that we can do and redeploy ourselves as outreach personnel to be in areas we may not have before. But reach out to our clinical programs, especially those that may not be busy doing their surgeries and seeing patients. But we may have more access with some of our specialists that we can talk about strategizing and how to move forward out of this. Chris Hemphill: And Darren, your thoughts on this, just the bifurcated area that we’re in. Darren, I’m sorry. Let me unmute you. There we go. We’re both unmuted. Darren Burch: Yeah, sorry. There is a lot of split here where some pieces of the organization are crazy busy and others are not. And I think it’s really up to us to recognize how this is going to change in the future and what’s our place. And I think depending on your organization and where you sit in your organization and what your liaison team does, it’s going to be up to your team to really strategize and think about how things are going to look and operate, especially operate differently. I don’t have any more to share. I have a lot of ideas, but I could talk forever. Chris Hemphill: And Kriss, do you? Kriss Barlow: Yeah. And I guess, as we’re feeling this internally, you think about where the practices are. And again, a lot of those practices that have had to furlough their staff, they’re nervous, they’re scared. I think it’s going to be really important that liaisons are asking the right questions of those practices. And the ability to be able to glean themes from the referring market so that I can bring those back and say, “I got two thirds of my independence that are concerned about if they can make payroll next week.” Maybe we need to step up where we are with some of our alignment strategies. So, voice of customer in my mind is absolutely critical in this place. We can’t assume what’s happening, but we can ask good questions. We can bring that internally and we can help our leaders get on their toes instead of their heels on that. Chris Hemphill: Fantastic. We’re running a little bit low on time, so I’m going to do a little bit of trimming to the agenda. But I just wanted to remind everybody that we’re in, like… If anybody just logged in, we’re in the panel portion of the webinar. We’re going through a few prepared questions and we’ll then be talking about some key takeaways and try to address some questions from the audience. But since we’re a little bit low on time, I just want to jump into the question on key metrics for executives. What should we be tracking? How can our outreach teams align from the executive perspective? I feel like Robert has given us some really good perspective, maybe even something that YouTube could leap on, but Chris just given your broad experience and your role in planning. Could you share a little bit of some light on that, on relevance for executives? Kriss Barlow: Yeah, I think our internal leadership is very much in transition. I think we’ve all spoken to that. I think right now, voice of customer is an acute need for them. They’d been insular, they’ve been looking at what they’re best at, which is operations and finance inside the building. It’s absolutely our near term obligation to organize what we’re hearing from the physician audience and to be able to help them prioritize those needs areas. I think that’s just going to be number one, for our leadership. We also are going to have to look at numbers. Some teams are doing some really interesting things with surgical numbers to be able to say, “Talk to an orthopedic surgeon. He’s got 62 total hips that are waiting in the wings.” We can also bring to some data from the field in, in addition to just watching and level setting where we’re going to go with our metrics for referrals that can come in. Chris Hemphill: And Darren, your thoughts on the executive perspective? Darren Burch: I think, moving forward, I’ve heard some executives speak at Legacy Health about, what does this look like after. And I think the biggest thing is reassuring consumers. It’s okay to come to the hospital, it’s okay to get care now, our ER volumes are way down. And so, how are we going to turn this around? How are we going to reassure consumers? And how are we going to align our strategy with our partner strategy and vice versa? As well as insurance payments and reimbursement models, how are we going to go after some dollar figures? And how are we going to grow that business? Chris Hemphill: Fantastic. What we’ll do is we’re going to jump into a few key takeaways and then we’ll try to get to as many audience questions as possible, but I just wanted to help round out the presentation, the talk that we had with the few key takeaways. Go into presenter mode. There we go. Okay. All right. So, just a few minutes on approaches to help aid thinking on COVID-19 recovery efforts and beyond. The first thing that we want to start with is to find a way, a structured way to think about capturing provider needs. CMS has guidelines that can help aiding and determining that structure. And in this example we built that structure into a physician relationship management tool. So, whether it be through surveys, through your PRN system spreadsheets or what have you, it’s important to capture the actions that are needed for individual physicians and then to be able to aggregate those, aggregate those into a view to make better strategic decisions, From a data science perspective, something that we’re heavily focused on is understanding needs on a directly on a one-to-one basis. I mentioned the structured approach, but it’s also important when you’re using these tools to track your engagement to thoroughly document meetings and things and interactions that you have with provider community. We see significant intelligence from thousands of meetings on the front lines with physicians. And what we’re showing is some recent Intermountain Healthcare data that shows recent uptakes and conversations around COVID and their value based care on Castell. But it’s important for it lies on some teams to make sure that that information is being documented so that decisions can actually be made from those notes. Then when we go into analyze this questions of what’s the impact of the outreach that we’re doing? How much value and volume are we driving through the meetings that we’re having? And what’s the over-saturation point? When is too much, too much? Analysis helps answer those strategic questions and help grow the team accordingly. And in the act phase, I wanted to cover a next best actions mindset. And what a next best action is, is a data driven way to determine what the next step should be in your interactions with provider, patient, or anybody interacting with healthcare. In your organization today, you could start with next best actions just by identifying some trends that are going to say, “Hey, rather than going out to the typical group of people that have been meeting with or having the same conversations, how about we look at things like the moving average?” In this display, we’re looking at if the moving average of referrals, if the amount of referrals that we’re doing falls below what we expect, that’s a trigger to have outreach. The concept is to take the tools that you have today and just think through how you can find incidents and actions in the market to take a data driven approach to managing relationships with physicians. As a reminder, we’ve got a ton of questions in, if you have any burning questions for our panel there is the Q and A link below. Go ahead and use that if we want to ask some questions and we’ll either get to them on the call or afterwards. And additionally, there’s so much energy, you heard from Daniel a little bit earlier today. But given this time, the fact that it had to uproot everything, like I wish I was in Las Vegas earlier this month but they’d have to reschedule everything due to these challenges. But there’s a huge community that they’re building. They have an entire track dedicated to physician liaison. That’s going to, as we’re moving forward in August, a lot of the presentations and networking and things like that, that we’ll see there, are going to be instrumental in how we move forward and stay ahead. And really do the best for our doctors and providers and do the best for our executives as well. We’ll all be there, Kriss Barlow, Robert, you’ll be able to hear deeper speeches and presentations from Intermountain Healthcare and Barlow McCarthy. Lots of reasons to go to HMPS this year. And I salute them for the energy that they put into this. Before we jump into the Q and A, there’s always something that we want to help everybody come away with. We’ve recorded this entire presentation, you’ll get all the Q and A, the video feedback. We’re developing a physician relations COVID-19 checklist to take a lot of the points that we heard today from Intermountain and Barlow McCarthy and Legacy, and distill that into actions that you can start taking. And we’ll also have a case study that goes deeper on Intermountain Healthcare and how they coordinated all the strategy and tactics around how they coordinated their physician outreach efforts. And ultimately how they were able to value the team and do a lot of things that Robert was talking about. With that, I’m going to open it up to questions and what I’ll do, is that we had some questions come in before, and we also had some questions come in from zoom. Give me one second, I’ll pull those questions up. And we can go ahead and get started. The question I wanted to give a start with, is, this one comes from Michael McCullen who’s a provider or outreach manager at Geisinger Healthcare. And the question is, “what conditions need to be met before you change messaging focus from supporting COVID-19 based needs to promoting priority services?” They’ve determined that there’s some steps that make sense. Their first step is to respond to COVID needs, then promote services that can keep patients away from the ed and then go over as a third phase, go over additional post-COVID service priorities. Just want to throw it out to anybody who wants to take it. What conditions should be met before we start shifting from the COVID-19 mindset? We can jump with Kriss. Kriss Barlow: Well, I think the customer will tell you that. If they’re still in the crisis of the moment, it’s not time yet, but I certainly, as I start to script and think about my visits, I would start with where are you with this? And then I’d say, what are you hearing from your patients? Are you getting calls? Next question might be, and where are you personally in the mix of this? Are there things we need to support you now or are you looking ahead and needing some things? I would script two to three questions that follow exactly the path that Michael described to get me from, are you still in the crisis or are you starting to move on? And are your patients and your staff sort of forcing you to move on? And I would allow questions and my customer, guide me. Chris Hemphill: Darren or Robert, any additional feedback to that? I really liked this one just because it focused on the forward thinking aspect, accelerate to the new normal. Robert Perkins: Yeah. My thoughts were right in line with Kriss’. I think that the providers and their staff will dictate and help you know when they’re ready to move on post-COVID and I like Kriss’ thoughts, have some scripted questions ready now so as the provider start asking, you’re ready. Darren Burch: I would also add, just start making those calls. Most of these providers are not that busy. Start making the calls and asking questions, what their plans are in the future. Nothing’s stopping you right now because it’s… And most of the United States except for certain hotspots, it’s not in crisis mode right now. Kriss Barlow: The other one good question that I think would make a lot of sense to ask these practices is pick a clinical area. If you say, I’ve heard from a lot of other primary care docs that their orthopedic patients are the most antsy. Are you feeling the same? So, if you pick a clinical area that you know you’re going to want to ramp up with surgeries, let me go deeper down that path and use some light to light questions to start to play into that. Chris Hemphill: Thank you. Robert, you got one directly and that one was, how do you see referral patterns changing after the pandemic? Robert Perkins: Yeah, really good question. I think there’s ways to look at that and that is what providers have learned in their practices or through non-practicing that’s going to affect how they order. But the other is I really I’m predicting that referral patterns are going to change. Like I mentioned, habits are going to end, the more that we can align right now with those practices and providers we can create new alignments, strengthen the existing alignments like Kriss mentioned earlier. But I think what’s going to happen is the habits are going to be broken and providers are going to look for who they can get best access, who is willing to ramp up at the same level across services, ancillary services, surgeries, whatnot. It’s what hospital partner is going to align and be willing to adapt with me as I grow. And that’s where I’m going to refer my business. I’m going to change my habits. I’m willing to change my habits as a referring provider and I’m going to go with who really supports me and aligns with me. Again, some of those key things, access and whatnot. So, habits are going to be broken. And aligning right now is a key, key component. Chris Hemphill: Darren, you also got a direct question. It was related to how population health is taking on a new meaning down the road. Would love to have you expand on that and get some perspectives on what to prepare for and that’s what I mean. Robert Perkins: Well, number one, who’s been most effected as far as death with COVID-19? The people with comorbidities, right? Underlying disease. So, I think from a population health perspective is, if we really focus on preventative care and interventional care early, we can prevent more complications from COVID-19 or whatever it is in the future. And ACOs and population health organizations are really trying to do this. But now, I think there is a different look at it. It’s becoming more important and so it’s going to be insurance driven. We’re going to try to lower costs for patients and insurances and we’re going to look across an organization from primary care all the way through end of life about how we’re providing that care, and how we’re preventing care. For preventing, I guess, disease in the first place. Chris Hemphill: Thank you. Thank you very much. And gosh, it pains me to say this, but we are at the hour. We really appreciate this and before everybody drops off, just want to just remind everybody, just keep the community alive. Follow Kriss, follow Darren and Robert on LinkedIn. Kriss has put up a great community for physician liaisons to reach out and share best practices and things like that with each other. Let’s just keep this community and team building alive. Let’s take advantage of the opportunities that we have to meet in person once that’s safe, once we’re able to. And I hope that you guys have gotten a lot out of this. Again, we’ll be sharing a recording of this presentation and we have several more questions to answer. We’ll go ahead and get to those directly, but of course, keep the channel open. Feel free to flush out questions even after this call, because I know that something you might have hit and led to more questions. But with that, thank you very much.

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